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Retama 'Single Trunk’
Retama 'Single Trunk’
Retama 'Single Trunk’
Retama 'Single Trunk’
Retama 'Single Trunk’
Retama 'Single Trunk’

Retama 'Single Trunk’

Parkinsonia aculeata
$55.00
$110.00
Note : Preparation of materials for careful packaging of plants before shipping typically takes between 8-12 business days, in addition to the standard shipping times.

Height: 15-20'
Spread: 20’-25'
Bloom: April-August
Light: Full Sun
Water: Low to Medium
Zone: 8, 9, 10, 11
Origin: Texas

The Paloverde is a spiny shrub or small tree that can grow as high as 30 feet but is usually half that height. It has long, graceful branches bearing many long, delicate leaves and sprays of yellow flowers. Almost equal in size, the five yellow petals of the flower, measuring 1/3-2/3 inches long, are virtually identical, but one has a honey gland at the base. This petal remains on the stalk longer than the others. A profusion of blossoms can be found on the Paloverde during the warm months, especially after rains. Typically, the seedpods are approximately 3 to 5 inches long, narrow, and constrictive between the seeds. It is an unusual type of leaf. The leaf stem produces two stalks that are 15-18 inches long and almost parallel. Each branch has 10-25 pairs of leaflets. It is common for leaflets to fall off during the summer, and the stems will continue to serve as leaves.

This is a fast-growing, graceful-looking tree native to central Texas, southward to northern South America, and west to Arizona. It has unusual green bark and a long bloom season. In addition to being drought- and heat-resistant, it is also saline-tolerant. Despite its beauty, this thorny tree does best in spots that are neither too wet nor too dry. With too much moisture, it will seed out aggressively. It will lose all its leaves if there is not enough moisture. However, drought leaf loss is not necessarily an aesthetic problem because chlorophyll production shifts to the trunk and branches, rendering them an even brighter green. The word "Jerusalem" in the common name Jerusalem Thorn does not refer to the Middle Eastern city. Still, it is a corruption of the Spanish and Portuguese word girasol, meaning "turning toward the sun." This tree requires full sun.

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